Monday, April 7, 2014

Choosing A Name For Your Dog


Finding just the right name for your dog can be as difficult as naming a child.  In fact, there are a lot of similarities.  And you may (or may not) be surprised to learn that some of the same names are on both lists for babies and dogs.  Seems like now more than ever we are treating our dogs as our children--starting with naming them. 

Names like Sophia and Jackson--top choices for babies in 2013-- were #6 and 30 on the dog list.  This leads me to believe that we haven’t quite given in to the belief that our dogs are really our kids.  We still like to give them somewhat “dog” names. The most popular dog names in 2013 were Max and Bella, which were #41 and 93 on the baby list. 

There is, however, more to naming your dog than popularity.  It is usually considered good practice to stick to one or two syllable names (maybe this accounts for the popularity of Max and Bella).  If you think about historically popular dog names such as Spike, Fido, Spot, and Rover they all adhere to the one or two syllable rule.

Also, you want to make sure that your dog’s name doesn't sound like a common command.  A dog named Faye could get confused when you ask her to stay.


So, what are some good dog names? Check out the infographic for some suggestions!


11 comments:

  1. I answere this in Y/A, I will post it here as well, sorry if it shows up twice, I am not seeing it here.

    I think we are treating our dogs more as children, and quite possibly doing so without really understanding we are placing that significance on them. I read not too long ago in some article how "Americans" (we were singled out) treated out dogs as "family", still maintaining a difference of sorts, but including them as family. The article cited how we love to take our dog for rides in the car. It may or may not have gone on to say we treat them as children, I can't remember.

    Personally, I do view them as children. This wasn't something I thought about when getting my own dog, (I grew up with them as part of the family) at that point, I was thinking I just wanted a great companion. The first time I realized she was as a child to me, was when she was a pup, her her paw, limped her way into the house and held it out for me to fix. I felt pretty useless when all I could do was use words one would on a child. As time when on, I realized she was a child, she required me to make sure she ate, had a good place to sleep (my bed) and keep her healthy, and away from harm, as not having her fenced in could lead to others, afraid of large dogs, doing something, or her going on an exploration romp and forgetting where she lived, as happened twice, both of which caused me to fear for her safety and return. Due to the right people finding her, and the collar tag, I was called, and got her. She taught me a great deal more, such as unconditional love, which a child has for a long time, and how it is returned as a parent.

    Naming them is difficult. When I named her, I threw out conventional wisdom. I had wanted a boy, but there were only girls left in the litter. I was teaching Bruce Lee's martial art at the time, and had planned to name the boy Kato, after the Lee character in the Green Hornet. I named her Kato, thinking, she knew nothing of how humans have names that separate the genders, and that she would think it was cool. (ok, I thought it was, but stand by they don't care) She turned out to be the side kick/partner her name was inspired by. She became far more than a "dog", I no longer even like that word, when I see others on the road being walked, I call them babies. I've gone on to joke with others they don't like the word dog, and prefer fuzzy people.

    People can name them however they want, two syllables seems to make sense, but I don't think people should use it as a parameter in choosing a name. I am certain a fuzzy people would respond to, and remember, their name is penelope, if the owner didn't shorten it to pen. Personally, I would avoid the popular names for human babies, unless that is a name they really like. I think any name, or most are good, if that person feels they want to call them that. One of our family dogs was named Bandit, a girl, and while that may be on a "dog" list, it isn't on many human lists, can't say I know of anyone that has that on their birth certificate.

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    1. Thanks so much for sharing your naming story. I agree, I feel Coco is much more of my child than my dog. She has taught me more lessons about nurturing another than I ever expected. Having a dog as a companion is a gift that, if taken seriously, can be tremendously rewarding!

      Thanks so much for stopping by!

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  2. When we got Dakota his name was "Tanner" which didn't suit him at all. I always loved the name "Dakota' for either a boy or a girl. I looked it up, it means "Trusted Friend" in American Indian and that was it. Wasn't hard for me at all.

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  4. Its very interesting how names are picked
    love
    tweedles

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    1. I love your name Tweedles, but I have no idea how you go it!

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  5. My dogs are have been adult , already named rescue dogs- We adopted a pair named Bear & Sheba. Sheba recently died, and Behr-I changed the spelling, because I don't consider myself the caretaker of a dog named bear & he doesn't spell. Behr needed a companion after Queen Sheba left us. The dog that came into our life was named Teddy-I call her Tedi-Tedi & Behr are doing quite well and respond when ever they want to. These were meant to be in my pack.

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    1. I like the idea of keeping the name, but changing the spelling. Thanks for stopping by!

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  6. I named my dog Solace because she was my comfort after her predecessor was stolen.

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    1. What a great name! And stolen dogs are a problem that is much overlooked. Thanks for sharing :)

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